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Friday, August 10, 2012

Simple Ruffle-Butt Onesie

When I was in high school I used to babysit for the cutest little girl.  Her parents dressed her in the most adorable dresses, and always with ruffled bloomers underneath.  One day my mom was admiring her outfit, and the dad rolled his eyes and sighed, saying "Yeah, no outfit is complete without those ruffle-butt panties."  My mom and I thought we were going to die of laughter, and ever since I can't see a little girl in a ruffled diaper cover without thinking "Heh, ruffle-butt."

I have several friends who are expecting little ones, and it's always a challenge to find something 'new' to make to bring to a shower.  Blankets are always appreciated, as are hats and booties, but I like to go for the wow factor.  Especially if it doesn't take too much time or effort (ie. faster and easier than a blanket or booties).

And the last part of this (I like to tell you all the weird thoughts that have to collide in my brain in order for my latest idea to develop, I know they all seem so random, but hang with me)  my friend E, who is new to crochet, but is a bad-ass knitter, is the queen of the knit picker.  Do you have one?  Am I the only one that didn't know about this amazing little latch-hook tool?!  Okay, so we've been getting together monthly and calling it Crochet Club, which is really just an excuse for me to play with her baby and to see each other's projects in person.  Well, she's been making these adorable purses and crocheting the lining in.  Crocheting the fabric lining in.  Yeah, I kinda flipped out, because it was all kinds of awesome, and she said that she did it using a knit picker.  I couldn't wait, I immediately ordered one online (although my Joann's and Michaels do carry them, but I got all excited and ordered mine from Amazon.).  I got the ergonomic version, because it was green, which is my favorite color.


The possibilities of crocheting across fabrics was enticing, but once I had it, I wasn't sure what to do with it.  It's taken me nearly a month to come up with a project for it, but now that I've actually used it, I adore it.  I will warn you that there's a technique to it, but the learning curve is steep and I picked it up pretty quickly.

So, if you're interested in making a Simple Ruffle-Butt Onesie for a little one in your life read on.  The pattern in crazy simple, but this is a very image heavy tute because if you're like me and this is a new idea lots of pictures equals a high success rate!  And I love high success rates!!!  ;D

Simple Ruffle-Butt Onesie
Supplies (in order of appearance):
Purchased Onesie (I used a size 3-6 months, but you can use any size, the 'pattern' is adjustable)
Ruler (a plastic or wooden one, not a soft tape measure)
Disappearing Ink Fabric Marking Pen (I used one that will disappear without water, but if you already have a water soluble one, just use it and rinse the marks off when you're done)
Dritz Knit Picker
Baby Yarn (I used Cuddle by Sensations in Cuddle - Pink)
Scissors
Yarn Needle
Size D Crochet Hook

Start by marking the back of your onesie. You're going to make 4 lines straight across the back of it.  For size 3-6 months, or larger, make your first line across the back about an inch above the leg opening (for newborn or size 0-3 months make your first line 1/2 inch above the leg opening).  Make the next line an inch above your first line (3/4 inch for the itty-bitty sizes).  Make 2 more lines (4 in total!) leaving an inch between lines (3/4 inch for the NB and 0-3 mo sizes).


Mark each of the lines at 1/4 inch increments.  Start at the side seam and mark the line all the way across to the other side seam.  It really doesn't matter how many marks are on each line as long as they're 1/4 inch apart.  This is going to be your stitch guide.


Get out your Knit Picker and let's get going! I did a practice row, so you can see what we're going to be doing next.
The Knit Picker has a tiny (sharp!) latch hook end.  For this first part, we're going to use it like a crochet hook, and wiggle it into the fabric at the first mark.  I found it was MUCH easier to use the sharp point of the hook to pierce the fabric, instead of trying to force the rounded head of the hook through.
Once you get it through the fabric, push it in far enough that the 'latch' part is through too.  We're going to need it for the next step.

To start the row of stitches, I just held the yarn as I looped it through the hook part.  When the yarn is inside the hook section, flip the latch up to secure it in place (it won't stay up, but we only need it to hold the yarn as it goes through the fabric).


Pull (gently, but firmly) the loop through the fabric.  The loop doesn't have to be very big, but make sure that it's not too small.  It's super important that these stitches be a little loose.  Now, do it again!  Put the hook part through the fabric at the next mark, add the yarn, flip the latch and...

Pull another loop through!  This time, pull it through the first stitch as well!  Yippee, we're making a chain!  Keep going!  Go to the end of the row!  Your first stitches will be awkward and you may get some splits and other unpleasantness, but by the end of the row you'll have gotten the hang of it.  (It's so cliched, but this really is a case of practice makes perfect).  If you really hate it, you can always pull it out and try again.

When you get to the end of the row, leave a big loop.

This time, instead of putting the Knit Picker through the fabric from the top going in, you're going to put it through the fabric from the inside coming out.  Ideally it would be just a few threads over from the last loop you made.  Put the latch around the loop and pull it to the inside of the onesie...

Okay, this picture makes my thumb look freakin' huge!  In reality, I have almost freakishly small hands, so this is a really good picture to show how tiny the tip of the Knit Picker is.  Now that you've got the loop pulled to the inside, you can fasten it off.

This is what the inside of your onesie will look like at this point.  Now weave in those ends before we go on to the next part.

This is what the outside of the onesie should look like at this point.

The ruffle is the easiest part! Attach the yarn to the first stitch of the row.  Using your size D crochet hook, chain 3, put 5 dc in the first stitch, 4 dc in each stitch across, 6 dc in the last stitch.  Fasten off, weave in ends.
Repeat on the other three rows.  Give yourself a pat on the back for trying something new!  Go get an ice-cream cone to celebrate how awesome it turned out! Wrap it up in fancy-shmancy packaging and steal the limelight at your friend's baby shower... Uh, did I just say that part out loud?...

(My kid was half booty when she was a baby, thus the spacing on the ruffles.  If your kid is more back than booty, you could add another row that starts at the top of the leg openings, and take the top row off. Custom Ruffle-Butts for everyone!!)

xoxo

36 comments:

  1. I've been wanting one of those Knit Pickers for a little while now. You may have convinced me to get one.

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  2. Hi Nyan! I want you to get one for my own, selfish, reason: I think you would come up with some really cool stuff to make with one!
    xo Jaime

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    1. Thanks for this tutorial Jaime! I love all the possibilities this tool offers. I can see doing t-shirt embelishments for my granddaughters & definitely going to make some cute onesies for my first great-granddaughter!! I never thought of using the Knit Picker tool. It is just like the tool I use for making hook rugs only much smaller. Definitely going to get busy on some cute projects as the holidays approach. Thanks again! CraftyGram

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  3. Awesome! so glad you found a project worthy of the knit picker! super cute! and GREAT tutorial with all the close-up pictures! seriously, I feel like using the knit picker this way somehow IS a new thing -- I looked and looked, and can't find anyone else doing any kind of tutorials with it except the TECHknitting one about using it for no-sew zippers (that's what got me into using one in the first place) -- why isn't anyone else using these? we need to start a knit picker revolution! ;P

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    1. Let's do it! I always wanted to be part of a revolution! :D And you really are a bad-ass...
      xo Jaime

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  4. I must now look for an opportunity to say the phrase, "Custom Ruffle-Butts for everyone!" I'm thinking it might be appropriate at a Corgi bark-mitzvah with all those cute bunny-butts with pantaloons running around. I'm thinking adorable doggy onesies! This is so cool, I've never even heard of that knit-picker-thinger before. Now I want to know how EK (Excellent Knitter?) does no-sew zippers!

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    1. Ooh!! Oooh! I know that one! I'm going to add a link and a brief Dynamite tute on Knit Picker zippers next week!
      And I really think that Custom Ruffle-Butts for Everyone might make our CafePress shop... I would like to be invited to a bark-mitzvah sometime. Sounds like a whole room of awesome! (Not that that was a hint or anything. Ahem.)
      xo Jaime

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  5. Cool, I'll look for that zipper tutorial. (I hate wrestling with zippers! Under most circumstances. I'm going to stop talking about that now before I get censored...) Believe me, when Amos turns 13 (he's 10.5 now) you *will* be on the invite list for the barkmitzvah, because there is nothing more fun than a yardful of doggies eating kosher treats! Besides, that will give you and Mims an excuse to get all dressed up and let your inner-five-year-olds shine! All the girly dogs will want to have new dresses. (And of course, I'll have to crochet a bucketload of yarmulkes for all the human and canine males who attend. Time to start planning...) CR-BFE!!!!

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    1. Yippee! I want to make crocheted yarmulkes too!
      xo

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  6. PS - I really love it when you write about all the weird thoughts that collide in your brain when you get your ideas. It's inspirational, and provides even more opportunities to laugh my tuchus off!!!

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    1. Good, because it seems so random to me... I'm glad someone appreciates my weirdness...
      xo

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    2. ditto, ditto, ditto. I totally agree with Karen! Keep up the weirdness! (it feels like home!) (oh, was that kind of sappy? heehee!)

      :)

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    3. ♥ETF♥ that was indeed too sappy! But you're cute, so I forgive you.
      xo

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  7. Thanks for the tutorial, the pictures were most beneficial! I used to add edgings on a regular basis to my daughters' socks when they were babies/tots. They're all grown up with babies/tots of their own. I recently bought some basic tank tops that I was going to embellish and for the life of me could not figure out how I was going to do it (I couldn't remember how I did the socks). (I'd even tried several searches on Ravelry with the hopes of finding a close up shot of the initial. I must've used the wrong key/search word 'cause I was unsuccessful) It's all coming back to me now! That knit picker looks to be a great gadget. I know I've never bought one but it looks quite familiar...like something I may have seen in a sewing box or maybe my husband's tool box.
    Thanks again for sharing!

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  8. Hi bitosweets! The knit picker is a itty-bitty latch hook, so you probably have seen larger ones, like they use for making rugs/fluffy pillows. Also Dritz uses that exact same handle on their ergonomic seam ripper, which is pretty much the exact opposite of what we want! LOL!!!

    I don't know if this is helpful, but I did a post a few months ago on adding a ruffled edge to socks. Here's the link:

    http://www.crochetdynamite.com/2012/06/ruffled-socks-for-mims.html

    xo Jaime

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  9. NOW I need a knit picker! I use a small hole punch for my fleece blankets and double layer fabrics. This is great for onesies and such!
    Thank you!
    Jac

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    1. Hi Jac! The knit picker is awesome! I've found mine has become indespensible!
      xo Jaime

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  10. Thanks for the great tutorial. Now if only there were baby girls in my family.... My 3 sons have so far only produced one grandson... My nephew has given us a darling grand-nephew. Where are all the X chromosomes???? This may be cute for craft bazaar items at church. Would you mind??

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    1. Hi jesusgirl1108! I don't mind at all! In fact, let me know if you do use any of my patterns so I can tell everyone via my facebook, twitter and google+ accounts where they can come buy them!
      xo Jaime

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  11. Ruffle butts had me smiling...that is what we called those frilly things when my girls were little too! What a great idea to make your own...I may have to get a knit picker just to try this! Btw do you have the Christmas bow pattern for sale? I would love to make one for my granddaughter!

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    1. Hi DebiK! LOL!! I'm so glad that I'm not the only one that calls them that! And the bow pattern is going to be a free pattern available starting on the 6th! See you then!
      xo Jaime

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    2. Yay! I can't wait! Love your blog btw.

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    3. Thank you so much, DebiK! It means so much to me!
      xo Jaime

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  12. Replies
    1. Terriberri Febuary 08, 2013 10:00 P.M.

      Hi, I just found your site, and love your baby butt, and knit picker idea.I want to know if you think it would be o.k. for a newborn baby boy? Ruffles would match the hat color, and would be on a blue garment. Thank you.
      I just finished the usual baby hat, and would love to give something "orginal" to my friend.

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    2. You could try mkayk's idea of ruffles down the front to the waist area...be sure to add a bow tie and...Voila!...that baby boy has a ruffle front tuxedo!

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    3. Hi Gaga! That's an awesome idea!!! I love it!
      xo Jaime

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  13. Hi Terriberri!
    You know, I've given this a lot of thought. (Sorry I didn't answer you right away). I think that this pattern would be very feminine on a boy (not that there's anything wrong with femininity, but usually new parents of boys want to be overtly masculine). It really makes me think I need to do a knitpicker cape onesie! Lol! What'd I'd do is search the internet for some cool booties and make those to match the hat. Of course, if your friend is cool with ruffles, then I'd do that, too! Hope this helps.
    xo Jaime

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  14. omg that is STINKIN' CUTE! aw crap one grand-daughter is already 7 years. But No Matter - I have 2 more! and another due any day now. I am going to wow them. Hey - I am going to try a twist or tow of Sashay straight down the front of a Onesie! woo Hoo we are on a Roll! My daughter, now 35 with 2 sons, had alla that ruffle-butt stuff and we loved it, can't seem to find it much anymore. Girls Unite!

    I love your idea and I like how you write. U R Awesome
    thanks

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  15. A great idea for my friends who are going to be grandparents. I have made blankets, hat and a stuffed little bear as gifts. This will add to the gifts for the girls.

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  16. Can you explain how you did this "Pull another loop through! This time, pull it through the first stitch as well!"? I'm not quite getting that...is the Knit Picker put in the first stitch yarn and then into the fabric to pull yarn through?

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    1. Yes, that's exactly what I meant. You can see in the picture right above that part how I left the first loop on the knit picker. You're going to be making a chain across the fabric. :D I promise, once you get going it isn't complicated. Hope this helps!
      xo Jaime

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  17. Just found this on allfreecrochet and LOVE IT! Thank you so much! I'm anxious to try the project and really enjoyed your style of writing. So many times pattern instructions are dry and boring, but you got me excited and made me smile - you would be a great person to know.

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  18. Thanks for sharing this creative project! Love it! I'm thinking of doing something similar by adding crocheted collars to onesies (along with the ruffle-butt).

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  19. Darling! Have a granddaughter due May 30th and want to try this. Hope I understand the directions.

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  20. Great tutorial thanks. I also think I am going to do some ruffle butt diaper covers.

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